Cypress’ Maker of the Month: Andrés Sánchez and Jeisson David Torrecilla

Posted on February 28, 2017 by Samer Bahou

The Maker of the Month series recognizes unique projects created by the maker community. At Cypress®, we are committed to helping our customers (international OEMs and makers alike) bring their innovations to life with our easy-to-use software tools and programmable solutions. For more information about Cypress’ maker community involvement, check out the rest of our Maker of the Month series and our efforts to empower up-and-coming engineers via the Cypress University Alliance (CUA).


Read the Q&A with Cypress’ Makers of the Month for February 2017, Andrés Sánchez and Jeisson David Torrecilla.

February 2017 - Figure 1 February 2017 - Figure 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you please provide some background about yourselves?

We are two control engineering students at the Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Technology Faculty, Colombia. We’ve been using Cypress technology in our education and career paths for a number of years now. These days, we are interested in researching projects with artificial intelligence to help people who have disabilities.

How did you first become familiar with Cypress?

We were introduced to Cypress in our class, Digital Circuits II, as we were learning how to program microcontrollers. In our class, we learned that these microcontrollers had great analog features compared to other available options.

Cypress' technologies have a rich feature set and are better to use with integrated design environments (IDEs). We understand how the analog and digital circuits work, which is very helpful when you’re sliding and wiring the components in the IDE. For this reason, Cypress’ products have become useful tools in our careers.

You recently uploaded a project onto Hackster that shows how a car can be controlled by arm muscles. Can you tell us more about the project and the Cypress technology that is being used?

The project was assigned by our DSP I (digital signal processing) teacher as a final project for the last semester. The main objective was to control a car with digital signals taken from the body. We decided to use Cypress technology because we were familiar with PSoC®, we’ve been using it since our third semester.

We chose to work with PSoC 5LP because it let us use two UART blocks at different baud rates. Furthermore, it allowed us to send data between each block without errors. This was necessary because we were working with ASK RF modules which work with a low baud rate.

How did Cypress’ technology help execute your projects, and what are the benefits you’ve seen with using these technologies?

Cypress' technologies have a rich feature set and are better to use with integrated design environments (IDEs). We understand how the analog and digital circuits work, which is very helpful when you’re sliding and wiring the components in the IDE. For this reason, Cypress’ products have become useful tools in our careers.

We also want to highlight our partners who have done a good job at making tutorials for Hispanic users. www.psoclatinoamerica.com

Are either of you working on other projects that use Cypress’ technology?

Yes, we are participating in a Hackster.io contest sponsored by Cypress and Mouser. This contest, Sensing the World, requires us to use the Analog Coprocessor Pioneer Kit. We used PSoC to process instrumentation subjects too.

Can you tell us more about your project idea for the Sensing the World contest? What is your project idea?

Jeisson: My idea is to build a controlled environment using PID pseudocode for vermiculture.

Andrés: My idea was helping people with illnesses like Asthma or Rhinitis, or any other illness caused by mites.

How are you using the Analog Coprocessor Pioneer Kit to execute your design?

Jeisson: I used the Analog Coprocessor Pioneer kit to function as a temperature sensor, communicating MATLAB with the coprocessor by serial port, after I got the data and developed the PID Pseudocode.

Andrés: I learned that mites need a relative humidity higher than 50% and a temperature condition between 22 and 26°C, so I decided to use the Analog Coprocessor as a module to measure the temperature inside and outside of a bedroom, then compared it to the relative humidity in the bedroom. This is taken to actuate a dehumidifier system.

Have you run into any challenges?

Jession: Yes, in the beginning when I was learning to use the sensors. Thanks to the datasheets that Cypress offers, I was able to resolve my questions.

For questions or more information, you can reach out to Andrés Sánchez and Jeisson David Torrecilla on the following platforms:

Thanks again to Andrés Sánchez and Jeisson David Torrecilla for participating in our Maker of the Month program. If you would like to be considered for our next Maker of the Month profile, please email us and share a brief description of what project(s) you have made using Cypress’ technology.

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